Unizor -Creative Mind through Art of Mathematics

Unizor is an open source mathematics and physics Web site that seeks to promote intellectual strength, creativity and analytical abilities.  Unizor’s founder, Zor Shekhtman, does this through a series of lectures on mathematics and physics designed to help high school students exercise the mind just as one would exercise his or her body in a gymnasium.  The abilities strengthened by using Unizor can readily be applied to real life.  Another great strength of Unizor is that parents and other responsible adults are placed in charge of their students’ education.

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Zor discusses Permutations.

So, how does Unizor do this?  A parent/supervisor goes to Unizor’s Web site and creates an account for him or herself.  The parent/supervisor then has two roles.  The first is to enroll his or her students into instructional programs.  The second is to manage the learners’ progression through the programs.  Each student has an account created by the parent/supervisor which makes this possible.  From here, students’ progress can be monitored, including exam scores, and they can be passed on to the next level within the course.

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Zor discusses possible outcomes of a given set of options.

How does Unizor work?  Each topic is presented by Zor Shekhtman as a video lecture.  Far from being dry, Zor conveys his enthusiasm for the curriculum through his instruction, which makes the lectures very engaging.  Zor also utilizes visual aids and examples to enhance the learning experience.  The educational experience is further augmented by the use of other media and materials.  Furthermore, teachers are not left out.  To quote from the Unizor home page, “The function of a Unizor teacher is to provide quality educational materials. Control over educational process is not a function of a Unizor teacher, this is supposed to be provided by parents/supervisors.”  Teachers can modify both instructional content and exams as well.

Unizor has a very different approach to mathematics education than the more prevalent  principles utilized by many schools.  These principles have an emphasis on formulas and procedures and the memorization of these.  The problem with this is that students, not finding immediate real-world application for this information, will soon forget it once the assessment is passed.  Unizor focuses on a logical and analytical approach to mathematics education, encouraging problem-solving, proving theorems, axiomatic foundation and rigorousness of educational material.  This approach is conducive to the development of students’ minds, something that will be of value in any occupation.

Unizor is ideal for learners who have been identified as gifted and talented.  The opportunities for academic and intellectual growth abound here.  Be aware, that Unizor is a work in progress.  However, there are more than 400 lectures available with more to come.  You should also know that the physics component is still predominantly under development.  So take control of your student’s learning and create a supervisor account on Unizor’s Web site today.

Resources

Unizor Home Page

References

http://unizor.com/

FisicaLab: Solve Physics Problems

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One of the great benefits of mailing lists is that you have the opportunity to learn about new things. In this case, the new thing that I have learned about via the schoolforge-discuss mailing list is FisicicaLab, an open source educational application developed to solve physics problems. FisicaLab handles all of the mathematics related to physics, giving the user the ability to focus purely on physics. So, without further adieu, let’s take a closer look at this thought-provoking piece of software.

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FisicaLab running on the MATE Desktop Environment.

The graphical interface is similar to that of GIMP, incorporating multiple windows. Unlike GIMP, FisicaLab utilizes only two windows initially. The main window is called the Chalkboard and the other window is entitled Modules and Elements. The Modules and Elements tool enables users to add items to the Chalkboard and to modify those items. Buttons at the top of the Modules and Elements window allow users to toggle between different types of elements. (See the screenshot for a typical session). Additional windows open as needed.

FisicaLab allows users to manipulate virtual objects such a blocks, pulleys and forces. These can be handled and allowed to interact in a variety of ways, including, but not limited to, relative motion, collision and explosion. Other factors that can be adjusted include friction and force, among others. FisicaLab gets a high level of expandability via additional modules which users can install. These modules include, but are not limited to, kinematics of particles, dynamics of particles and calorimetry, ideal gas and expansion.

This brief article is written merely to inform and cannot do this wonderful application justice. If you teach physics, FisicaLab is designed with both instruction and learning in mind.

FisicaLab is available for Linux, Microsoft Windows and Apple MacOS.

Resources
GNU FisicaLab Home Page

FisicaLab Manual

Schoolforge.net

References
GNU FisicaLab Manual. (n.d.). GNU General Public License. Retrieved from http://www.gnu.org/software/fisicalab/manual/en/fisicalab/index.html#SEC_Contents.

All images are from the GNU FisicaLab Web site.