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A Brief Survey of Comic Book Viewers

One thing that has chagned quite a bit since I was a kid is the attitude that schools and teachers have towards comic books.  When I was a child, if you had a comic book in school, you wouldn’t have it for long, as such things were viewed as the antithesis of education.  The attitude now is that so long as kids are reading, it’s a good thing, even if it’s a comic book, which I think is a big improvement.  My middle school library has a fine collection of graphic novels, in addition to the other media that they offer.  Anyway, I thought that I would write about some open source comic book viewers that work with graphic novel ebooks and that you could use in your classroom.

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Comix displaying a graphic novel.

Comix.  Comix is a very versatile and easily customized comic book reader.  Ir reads most common image formats, not just .cbr (the native format for digital comic books).  Comix supports the storing of comic book libraries as well as allowing users to adjust how they view their comic book reading.  Users can zoom in and out as desired.  As it presents one page from the comic at a time, the page being viewed can be rotated to suit the reader.  For the die-hard comic book fan, media can be displayed in two-page format, if desired.  Archive formats supported include .tar, RAR and ZIP.  Comix supports the use of bookmarks to mark pages of interest.  Comix features integrated archive editing.  Though Comix is available only for UNIX-based operating systems, it is available in over 20 languages.  The screenshot at left shows the author’s Comix session, displaying a page from DC Comics’ Batman: Gotham by Gaslight graphic novel, as do the other screenshots featured in this article.

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A majestic Wayne Manor displayed in QComicBook.

QComicBook.  QComicBook is highly customizable and provides the user with every feature that he or she would desire through either menus or its toolbar.  The Read Me file will tell you that the developers of QCmicBook sought to keep convenience and simplicity at its core.  In addition to comic archive files (.cbr), it also supports handling of .jpg, .png, .gif and .xpm image formats, as well as PDF files.  Users can navigate through a comic or graphic novel via a context menu, navigation buttons on the toolbar or by clicking on images of pages in the Thumbnail pane to the left of the main viewing pane.  Other features include automatic unpacking of archive files, full-screen mode, double page viewing and continuous scrolling mode, among others.  QComicBook is available for UNIX-based operating systems.

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MConix browsing a graphic novel.

MComix.  MComix is based on Comix, but offers a few embellishments.  These embellishments pertain predominantly to a few bug fixes as well as improved stability.  MComix’s creators boast that it is both user-friendly and customizable.  The interface is very approachable, incorporating a menu, a simple toolbar and a side pane for selecting individual pages. It is designed specifically for comic books and graphic novels, and supports a variety of formats, including .cbr, .cb7, .cbt and PDF.  What makes MComix really great is that it is available for both Linux and Microsoft Windows.

I’ve presented three comic book viewers here.  So what can you do with them in your classroom?  Just as you might buy printed graphic novels for your classroom library, it’s just as easy to buy them in digital format.  You could set up a couple of second hand laptops (they’re cheap on ebay) with libraries of graphic novels on them.  Your students then sign up for a time to use one of these computers to do some reading.  You could even provide them with a reading log so that they can keep track of where they’ve left off rather than to have multiple students using the same integrated bookmark feature, which could get confusing.

Resources

Comix Sourceforge Page

MComix Sourceforge Page

QComicBook  Web Site

References

Augustyn, B. et al.  (1989).  Batman: Gotham by gaslight.  New York: DC Comics.

Casillas, L. & Brunner, M.  (2013).  MComix [computer software].  GNU General Public License.

Ekberg, P.  (2009).  Comix [computer software].  GNU General Public License.

Stolowski, P.  (2012).  QComicBook [computer software].  GNU General Public License.

Stolowski, P.  (2012).  QComicBook read me.  Retrieved from https://github.com/stolowski/QComicBook/blob/master/README.

 

QComicBook.  Q